St. Patrick Converts the 50 Foot Woman. © Kevin McCloskey, 2015

St. Patrick Converts the 50 Foot Woman. © Kevin McCloskey, 2015

My grandpa Patrick McCloskey immigrated from Donegal, Ireland. I got the grand idea to have some fun with St. Patrick, the most sacred hero of the Island of Saints. Fortunately for me, the Irish, even religious fundamentalists, tend to have a sense of humor.  St Patrick: The Lesser-Known Miracles will be exhibited at the AFA Gallery, Scranton, March 5-28. The prints will be up for St. Patrick’s Day.

Patrick & Celia McCloskey with baby Patrick, Mary, James (center front my dad)  and John

Patrick & Celia McCloskey with baby Patrick, Front: Mary, James ( my Dad) and John.

These are relief prints, carved from wood or linoleum. It is a down-and-dirty way of printing. In my case, a bit the prints are rough-hewn, but they tell a story. I learned this process from masters like Tom Huck and Endi Poskovic and from my printmaking friends in Oaxaca.

St. Patrick Arm-Wrestling a Pagan. © Kevin McCloskey 2015.

St. Patrick Arm-Wrestling a Pagan. © Kevin McCloskey 2015.

One of the new miracle prints is a linoleum cut of St. Patrick arm wrestling a Pagan. Kutztown printmaking student Victoria Beck asked if the pagan was Tom Huck. Good eye, there is a resemblance. I made my first St. Patrick print at Huck’s studio, Evil Prints in St. Louis. So this image is a shout-out to Huck. On another level, the legend of St. Patrick driving the snakes out of Ireland may be rooted in his driving the tattooed druids out of power.

The Irish discovery of Pi.

The Irish discovery of Pi.

I’ve read Thomas Cahill’s book How the Irish Saved Civilization and Seamus MacManus’s The Story of the Irish Race. Both interesting books celebrate Irish exceptionalism. I am proud of my Irish ancestry, but I toy with this sort of myth-making in my prints. Every nationality tends to inflate their ancestor’s contributions, I suppose.

St. Patrick Driving the Elephants from Ireland

St. Patrick Driving the Elephants from Ireland © KMc 2012

Reading Eagle reporter Lisa Scheid wrote about this project here. “We see a lot of pictures of a saintly St. Patrick, but Kutztown University professor Kevin McCloskey wants people to see something more. McCloskey, a printmaker and an Irish-American who has participated in his share of St. Patrick’s Day parades, has a series of prints about St. Patrick. The series, “The Lesser Known Miracles of St. Patrick,” doesn’t depict any aspect of the saint or legend but is a celebration of its spirit. Patrick came to Ireland as a kidnapped slave; he escaped and then, surprisingly, returned. “It’s kind of a subversive idea to go back and want to change a country,” McCloskey said. “With a religion from the Middle East, he returned to this cold, tough place to spread love.”

Original woodblock, St. Patrick's Headstand, 12 by 16 in, used as illustration for Reading Eagle 3/17/14.

Original woodblock, St. Patrick’s Headstand, used as illustration for Reading Eagle 3/17/14.

St Patrick: The Lesser-known Miracles can be seen at AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave, Scranton from March 5-28. Opening: Friday March 6, First Friday 6-9pm. I will be there and look forward to meeting my fellow exhibitors, Veronica Lawlor and Chris Spollen. Gallery info here.  A few more St. Patrick prints can be seen here.  If I don’t see you before March 17, Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

AFA Gallery announcement, Opening March 6, Scranton, PA.

AFA Gallery announcement, Opening March 6, Scranton, PA.

Many thanks to my friend Scranton-based illustrator Ted Michalowski for introducing me to the AFA Gallery. Thanks, too, to Dean Bill Mowder of Kutztown University for a grant to support this project.

Prof. John K. Landis.

Prof. John K. Landis.

Professor Emeritus John Landis returned to Kutztown University for the dedication of the Landis Press. It’s a rather small press in a very small room, but the event was large. Prof. Vicki Meloney recalled her days studying typography with Prof. Landis at Kutztown in the 1990’s.

Kutztown U Communication Design Prof. Vicki Meloney

Kutztown U Communication Design Prof. Vicki Meloney

She saw the first Apple computers arrive on campus. The visionaries of the digital revolution persuaded educators all across the nation to trash their letterpresses and make room for computers.

landisplaque

Vicki Meloney recalled learning her love of typography in Landis’s Letterforms class. She told current students how she drew lines of type with ruling pens and rapidographs on illustration board. “It’s how I learned to love type,” she said. “Kerning was something we did by hand and eye. There was no a keyboard command for kerning.”

John Landis with Prof. Ann Lemon displaying the commemorative plaque.

John Landis with Prof. Ann Lemon displaying the commemorative plaque.

When Prof. Meloney was granted a sabbatical she tracked down press equipment John Landis had saved from the dumpster. She brought a rusted Thayer and Chandler platen press (circa 1900) to her home and asked her stepfather to help restore it. It was a family bonding experience. Her stepdad, unbeknownst to her, had worked on a similar press as a teenager. Meloney thanked Ron Lamm, KU’s Studio Art Technician for work on the press, and Prof. Ann Lemon, who poured enormous energy into making the Landis Press room a reality.

Printed work by students of John K. Landis. circa 1985.

Printed work by students of John K. Landis. circa 1985.

John Landis brought dozens of samples of student work he had saved. He said student designs were ganged together and sent to Reading, PA for photoengraving. The plates came back to KU to be inked and printed on the university letterpress under his watchful eyes.

Sophisticated type styling for Bangkok by a student of JKL

Sophisticated type styling for Bangkok by a student of JKL.

These images are about the size of index cards. I asked if they were meant to be luggage decals. He said, no, just graphic designs, mini-posters, really, their small size dictated by the size of the press.

Chigago Landmark.

U.S. Landmarks by students of John Landis

Besides foreign nations, he assigned a variety of projects based on landmarks, great cities, and unusual numbers.

Design like this is coming back, I hope.

KU student design showing “visual verbal synergy.”

John Landis taught many of the KU profs who now teach Communication Design at Kutztown including Professors Cunfer, Kresge, Bosler, Doll-Myers, Meloney, and Chairperson Todd McFeely. I’m told that makes him a “grandprof.” Someone said he is “great-grand prof” since he taught Prof. Cunfer, who taught Prof. Doll Myers.

From the odd numbers file, student of JKL

From the odd numbers file, student of JKL

Looking at the student samples, Prof. Landis remarked that what he hoped for in the typography project was “visual-verbal synergy.” That phrase still echoes in the studios at Kutztown. Speaking to current students Prof. Landis said printing is a proud part of our history. “Benjamin Franklin of Philadelphia did many great things in his life -signer of the Declaration of Independence, ambassador to France, experimenting with electricity. But for the inscription on his tombstone he chose simply, ‘Ben Franklin, Printer’.”

Ribbon Cutting for the restored Landis Press. Photo by Chelsea Gassert.

Ribbon Cutting for the restored Landis Press. Photo by Chelsea Gassert.

More info about The Landis Press, including hours of operation can be found here.

Cheryl Sheeler showing her portfolio to senior Arren Dawinan.

Cheryl Sheeler showing her portfolio to senior Arren Dawinan.

Profs Summer Doll-Myers and Vicki Meloney invite recent grads back to show their portfolios to portfolio class. Cheryl Geiger Sheeler, BFA ’12, visited this week. Cheryl was a non-trad student, who returned to study illustration after raising her family. Her inspiring story of being an older grad was featured in Berks County Living.

Cheryl Gieger Sheeler's portfolio

Cheryl Geiger Sheeler’s portfolio

Cheryl’s portfolio is a hot red leather horizontal book with a custom-embossed signature on the cover. Cheryl’s portfolio was crafted by Brewer Cantelmo of New York City. Custom portfolios can cost hundreds of dollars plus the cost of color printing for interior pages.  Cheryl was good enough to dig out her receipt for the portfolio pictured above. I get sticker shock looking at it. When I was starting out in illustration my portfolio cost less than the $47.50 she spent on the handle.

Total cost portfolio book with student discount over $400, before printing.

Total cost portfolio book with student discount over $400, before printing.

Cheryl told the class that she showed this portfolio just once, at the Spring KU event where grads share work with prospective employers.     “It is just a fact of life, at my age, a design studio is not going to hire me,” she said with a shrug.

Illustrations by Cheryl Sheeler © Demme Learning 2014

Illustrations by Cheryl Sheeler © Demme Learning 2014

Ageism is not certainly unique to the field of Communication Design, and Cheryl remains upbeat. She added that she has found a considerable amount of interesting freelance work by networking with KU classmates.

More work by Cheryl Sheeler © Demme Learning 2014

More work by Cheryl Sheeler © Demme Learning 2014

“Keep reminding your students to stay connected to people they meet at KU,” she says, “you never know where it may lead. I only met Dan Peiffer my last semester in greeting card class, but the connection turned out to be great.” Dan is now Lead Designer at Demme Learning, Lititz, PA, a growing publisher specializing in educational materials for home schoolers. Another KU classmate, Justin Kramer is Design Manager there. Over that past 2 years Cheryl has done about 9 months freelance work for Demme.

Launch page for her website at: www.geigersheeler.com

Launch page for her website at: http://www.geigersheeler.com

The work for Demme all began with an urgent Facebook plea by Dan for illustrators. Cheryl said she replied the instant she saw his note. She has since done a total of 242 illustrations for Demme. Turns out Facebook and her website have proved more useful for Cheryl than that red leather portfolio.

Concept for Cape May, NJ, local currency.© Cheryl Sheeler.

Concept for Cape May, NJ, local currency.© Cheryl Sheeler.

We’ll close with a few of her favorite illustrations from her web page. The local currency, above, is based on the gingerbread architecture of Cape May, NJ. The images below are details from her visual essay about a pair of fainting goats given as a wedding present to her daughter, country singer, Haley Sheeler. Below that are some fantasy barnyard characters that might someday appear in a children’s book.

Haley's goats © 2011 Cheryl Sheeler.

Haley’s goats © 2011 Cheryl Sheeler.

Barnyard creatures © 2011 Cheryl Sheeler

Barnyard creatures © 2011 Cheryl Sheeler

 

Edith Chavez, center front, and Alan Altamarino, center back with KU students at Taller Chicharra.

Edith Chavez, center front, Alan Altamarino, at back & KU students at Taller Chicharra.

While ice storms hit the U.S. a group of Kutztown students spent 17 days of winter break in sunny Oaxaca, Mexico. We worked with a group of talented young printmakers in Taller La Chicharra (translates as the Cicada Studio).

Alan Altamarino  on press pulling a large scale print with Kevin McCloskey

Alan Altamarino on press pulling a large scale print with Kevin McCloskey.

Alan Altamarino, who also goes by MK Kabrito, runs the studio. He is a recent graduate of the School of Fine Arts at UABJO, Oaxaca. He specializes in large format relief prints. In the image above he carved MDF, multi-density fiberboard, to print a mega-print for his upcoming exhibition in Guadalajara.

knox

Nueva Vida, 2-color woodblock print by KU student Elaine Knox.

Printmaking studio classes were scheduled from 11-4, but at times the KU crew was still working happily as late as 10pm. Of course, they took a long dinner break around 3pm. Some brave souls sampled fried grasshoppers, a typical Oaxacan snack.

Pajaro Rojo, print, by KU Prof. Miles DeCoster

Pajaro Rojo, print, by KU Prof. Miles DeCoster

Each student created an edition of 15 black and white prints for a portfolio to exchange with their classmates. They also created a limited edition with a second color printed from a block of carved plywood.

Figura Prehispanica, detail, by Ashley Ridgway.

Figura Prehispanica, detail, by Ashley Ridgway.

We came as a group with a reservation, but Taller La Chicharra offers short classes for visitors throughout the year. Besides woodblock, they offer classes in serigraphy and engraving metal via electrolysis. Typically, courses are for half-days and last a week. The cost ranges from 500-1000 Mexican pesos, $40 to $80 U.S.

KU student Blake Myers sketching in the mountains of Mexico.

KU student Blake Myers sketching in the mountains of Mexico.

“Impressions From Oaxaca” prints from the KU workshop will be on exhibit at the Student Gallery, Sharadin Building, Feb 10-15.

KU students carving blocks at Chicharra.

KU students carving blocks at Chicharra. Photo: Miles DeCoster

We had time for trips to the Prehispanic ruins at Monte Alban and Mitla. A highlight was a journey to the petrified waterfall known as Heirve el Aqua.

Wolfgang and Brigid inking plates. Photo M.DeCoster

Wolfgang and Brigid inking plates. Photo: M.DeCoster

Muchas Gracias to Alan Altamarino, Edith Chavez, Marcus Lucero, Mariana Rivera, and all the wonderful Oaxacan artists who made our time in Mexico so memorable! Nos Vemos! See you again!

Blake Myer's sketch of Oaxaca Valley as seen from Monte Alban

Blake Myer’s sketch of Oaxaca Valley as seen from Monte Alban

The observatory at Monte Alban by Malia Balas

The observatory at Monte Alban by Malia Balas

Welcome reception at Hostal Don Nino.

Welcome reception at Hostal Don Nino.

The Hostel Don Nino gave us a welcoming reception of flautas, which are like fried enchiladas, guacamole, Oaxacan cheese and aqua de Jamaica. It is not easy to post from my ipad here, but I will share student drawings and post more when we return from our 17-day Oaxaca tour.

Mariana Rivera giving us a tour of the Opera House.

Mariana Rivera giving us a tour of the Opera House.

Rebekah, Ashley, and Jen sketching at San Pablo

Rebekah, Ashley, and Jen sketching at San Pablo

13 KU students and Prof. Miles Decoster are with me sketching in Oaxaca. In less than 36 hours we have seen the San Pablo Center, site of the first Spanish Settlement in the early 1500’s. Then we visited the ancient Zapotec site at Monte Alban, founded circa 500 B.C, it may have been the very first city in North America. It had 30,000 people at its height. We also visited the Macedonia Alcala Theater, a wonderful old opera house, where we were allowed on stage and on the roof. We met the ASARO printmaking collective, and the students are doing wonderful sketches.

We will be having an exhibition of our prints at the Student Gallery in Sharadin Feb 10-15.

 

WordPress.com’s 2014 annual data report for illustration concentration. Had about 35,000 visitors. If you want more details, click below.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 35,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 13 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

details from Pyongyang All art © 2001, Guy Delisle

details from Pyongyang All art © 2001, Guy Delisle

I’ve been to Seoul and Pusan in South Korea, but everything I know about Pyongyang I learned from a comic book. Guy Delisle drew a marvelous book, Pyongyang, a graphic memoir of working there in 2001.

socks

Few Americans ever visit Pyongyang. Delisle is Canadian from Quebec, He was hired by a French studio to direct animations being drawn in North Korea. Odd, how the global race to the bottom in wages means children’s cartoons are made in the least happy country on earth.

prodogiesPyongyang was a critical success. The Globe & Mail (U.K )said: “smart, sharply observed and funny, without downplaying the untold horrors (death camps, starvation) that lurk around every corner.” Canada’s National Post wrote: “Tinged with black humour, Pyongyang offers a perspective no straight-up print journalism could.”

Screenshot from the blog at www.guydelisle.com

Screenshot from the blog at http://www.guydelisle.com

The book was translated into a dozen languages and optioned for film. Until last week it was going to be a movie starring Steve Carell. I expect it would have been a far more interesting film than The Interview. On December 19, Guy Delisle announced on his blog that he learned Pyongyang, the film, was canceled, collateral damage to the SONY fiasco. Delisle wrote, “What saddens me the most are the reasons that lead to this. One would have imagined that a huge corporation would not bend so easily under the threats of a group of hackers from North Korea. Apparently they hit a sensitive nerve.” Delisle’s full statement in English and French can be found here.

lovemoviesSpeaking of film, part of Pyongyang deals with the movies. Delisle learns that Kim Jong-Il, (father to today’s supreme leader Kim Jong-Un) loved the movies. Believe it or not, Kim Jong-Il’s secret police kidnapped South Korean filmmaker Shin Sang-ok and forced him to make films in Pyongyang.

PYONGYANG-01Get Pyongyang. Buy it, or ask for it at your library. It is a thoughtful book about an unthinkable place. You can read a free excerpt of Pyongyang at the website of Delisle’s Canadian Publisher, Drawn and Quarterly.

Cody, Olivia & Jesse, Founders of BRAINBUG

Cody, Olivia & Jesse, Founders of BRAIN BUG magazine

BRAIN BUG is a new kid’s magazine by three enterprising Kutztown University students. “It’s called Brain Bug because we wanted to incorporate something to do with the brain (to emphasize knowledge, understanding and giving kids REAL information) but we also want to be about things that are gross-out fun, and science related, like bugs.”

Centipedes among the bugs in Brain Bug. issue 1.

Centipedes among the bugs in Brain Bug. issue 1.

Editor-in-chief Olivia Knowles is a Fine Arts /Painting major. Brain Bug is inspired by her fond memories of the wacky energy of Nickelodeon magazine. “I’m also inspired by the attitude of my kids at the daycare I work at, -how much they love stickers, books, coloring pages, physical activity, and how curious they are about the “grown up” lives of all the staff members.”

panel from the story Culture Vultures by Cody Myers, Brainbug issue !.

panel from the story Culture Vultures by Cody Myers, Brainbug issue 1.

Cody Myers is a Business major, but he can draw comics like a pro, as can be seen in the Culture Vultures panel above. Jesse Warner is a Communication Studies major. Jesse says issue one took 4 months, but it is a bimonthy magazine, so they are going to speed up production. “Brain Bug to me is more than just writing about topics, it’s a little piece of things that I liked when I was a kid and still do.”

Cover of BRAINBUG, issue 1.

Cover of BRAIN BUG, issue 1.

Want to start a your own magazine? Here is a tip from Brain Bug: “Tell everyone. By telling literally everyone we’ve ever met about this project, we’ve received SO much support. It can’t hurt!”  The 30-page full-color magazine looks sharp. They used a digital printing service called MagCloud, recommended by KU Fine Arts Prof Dan Talley.

Kutztown, PA is on the map in BRAINBUG>

WOW! Kutztown, PA is on the map in BRAIN BUG

Olivia has high hopes for Brain Bug. “My hope for Brain Bug is that it gets big enough that we have a fairly substantial group of readers that are excited to get a copy every month and know exactly the feeling they’ll get when they open it. A lot of adult friends have bought copies, but my hope is that with the next several issues we can reach out to more kids and parents that don’t know us directly. I hope that our issues will continue to be thicker, have longer more juicy articles, and more comic contributors. I hope we can unify our aesthetic and establish a concrete style and expectation while still keeping the grab bag feel as much as we can!”

detail from "Our Gross Best Friends" in Brain Bug.

detail from “Our Gross Best Friends” in Brain Bug.

Brain Bug is looking for art, story and comic submissions! Guidelines: Non-violent, non-political, not an advertisement! A reading level that fits about a ten-year old, non-gender biased, has to fit the informative and fun the theme of our magazine. Issue 1 is nearly sold out. “We still have about 20 copies for sale, but there may be a repress! If anybody would like a copy, check out our online store! “ Get in touch with the team via Brain Bug’s Facebook page.

 

Peonies, all images in post © Danny Gregory, from his Flicker page.

Peonies, all images in this post © Danny Gregory, from his Flicker page.

“Danny Gregory and his wife, Patti, hadn’t been married long. Their baby, Jack, was ten months old; life was pretty swell. And then Patti fell under a subway train and was paralyzed from the waist down.

In a world where nothing seemed to have much meaning, Danny decided to teach himself to draw, and what he learned stunned him. Suddenly things had color again, and value. The result is Everyday Matters, his journal of discovery, recovery, and daily life in New York City. It is as funny, insightful, and surprising as life itself.”  – note from Hyperion, the publisher of Everyday Matters.

Hounds © Danny Gregory.

Hounds © Danny Gregory.

Danny Gregory is coming to Kutztown University on Thurs, Dec. 4, thanks to Prof. Ann Lemon. Danny is an artist, illustrator, teacher, filmmaker and writer. I see from my Amazon history that I first bought his Everyday Matters when it came out in 2007. Like so many others, I was touched by the story of how he sat at his wife’s side during her hospital stay, and how the act of drawing saved his life. We use two of his books, The Creative License and The Illustrated Life as texts in classes at Kutztown.

9781600610868_p0_v1_s600

Detail from Amsterdam Sketchbook ©Danny Gregory

Detail from Amsterdam Sketchbook ©Danny Gregory

I asked Ann Lemon three questions about Danny Gregory. I asked when she first met him and what was her favorite drawing? and what’s Danny really like? Below are her answers:

Ann Lemon:  “So, I honestly can’t remember how long ago I met Danny. I think it was back in the 90s through his art director partner, who went to school with me. But I got to know him when we both worked at mcgarrybowen. I maybe even was more friends with his wife Patti – but then everybody always was.

Sketchbook © Danny Gregory

Sketchbook © Danny Gregory

Then, kind of a weird surprise, after Patti died (major tragic accident) he began dating my good friend, J.J. Wilmoth, who had also worked at mcgarry. They moved out to L.A. together for a while when she took a job out there last year, but they both missed New York too much and returned a few months ago.”

Bad to the Bone by Danny Gregory

Bad to the Bone by Danny Gregory

“Not sure what drawing would be my favorite. Maybe the cover of Bad to the Bone cause I have a major crush on his dog, Tim. I hope Tim comes to the talk. Actually, as long as Tim comes, I don’t even care if Danny comes.

Self-portrait © Danny Gregory.

Self-portrait © Danny Gregory.

His work personality is absolutely the opposite of his book personality – at work he comes across as kind of tough, silent. Also, he is a writer by trade, not an art director, so a lot of people at work had no idea he had this other life as an artist. He’s really funny, but always serious, too. You’ll see.”

O.K. You’ll see, too. Come see Danny Gregory at Kutztown University, Thurs. Dec. 4 at 6pm, Academic Forum 101. Free and Open to the Public. Bring your sketchbook, Danny will not mind if you draw while he talks. Sponsored by The Communication Design Dept., KUSSI, and KU’s AIGA student group.

Frank of Mars, A.K.A Frank Marsters, a self-portrait.

Paeregrine, A.K.A. Frank of Mars, A.K.A Frank Marsters,  self-portrait.

UPDATE: FUNDED at $1800, 3 times original goal! Frank Marsters is also known as “Paeregrine” and “Frank of Mars.” A Kutztown Communication Design grad, he is creating a full-color comic book based on his popular web comic Paeregrine.Cast. The comic book project is already funded via Kickstarter and heading toward new goals. I’m a backer. I love it when a former illustration student takes the initiative to make a dream come true. You have until November 13 to share the dream, which Frank explains earnestly in his basement.

FacebookCover_Kickstarter1bQ. Frank, What year did you graduate from Kutztown University?
December, 2012, my entire KU experience took 5.5 years to complete.

detail from a recent strip © Frank Marsters.

detail from a recent strip © Frank Marsters.

Q. What were your concentrations?
I graduated with both Illustration and Interactive. I had enough classes to graduate with Graphics as well, but ended up dropping my last requisite class in my final semester to help save my sanity.

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BeardRex by Frank Marsters

Q.What is your day job?
I am currently working a few days a week as an in-house freelancer at Neo-Pangea,  where I did my Internship and where I was a part of the Intern Abuser project. In the evenings I am doing freelance illustration to help make ends meet. Ideally, I would like to make my comic my full-time job, but, alas, I’m not there yet.

Q. Can you tell us about the inspiration for the cast ?
The cast of characters are all people I interact with on a mostly daily basis. I originally started out looking at each character as a 1:1 representation of the person behind it, but it quickly became more about caricatures and exaggerated versions of these people. Paeregrine, BeardRex, Ondine, etc. have become characters of their own, loosely based on the people they represented.

Troy Gearthe, inspiration for cast member BeardRex.

Troy Gaerthe, inspiration for cast member BeardRex.

Troy Gaerthe is the inspiration behind the BeardRex character, he helped me out a good deal with some site issues early on and still is a big help/support to the comic.

Q. Technical Question: Where will you get the comics printed?
It is currently my plan to use a web-based service called “KA-BLAM”. I can print short runs based on how many of each cover are selected on Kickstarter. KA-BLAM will print “Sketch Covers” on good drawing paper making my hand-drawn cover reward a lot easier to complete.

Alternate covers by KU grads Nathan Hurst and Griffin McCauley.

Alternate covers by KU grads Nathan Hurst and Griffin Macaulay.

Q. What are the figures for web hits? What was your biggest day?
The comic’s website has undergone a few face-lifts, – since moving to the current incarnation it has over 100,661 page views.

The comic that got of 17 hits on day one!

The web comic that got 17,350 hits on day one.

The comic (above) about the sale of Mojang / Minecraft to Microsoft got the highest number of views I’ve had in a single day: 17,530. But that is way higher than my daily average.

Q. How many subscribers?
As of the moment there is no way to subscribe to the site itself. (Working on that. Fan/followers on social media, hovering around 300.)

Paeregrine.cast, detail, all art in this post © 2014 Frank Marsters

Paeregrine.cast, detail, all art in this post © 2014 Frank Marsters

Q. Are you getting hits internationally?
From a lot of different countries. My top 7 nations (all in the thousands of hits) are the USA, Canada, UK, Australia, Germany, Sweden, France, and the Netherlands.  The international attention astounds me and makes me really happy. The French branch of the major games company Bethesda shared one of my comics. That was a really big deal to me, they translated the message along with it and everything.

So, if you like, support the Paeregrine Kickstarter here and get the comic book for a pledge of only $8. Or, you can always read the Paeregrine.Cast free online, updated 3 times a week! ‘Nuff said.

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