ALPHA: Abidjan to Paris, -a graphic novel

The landscape of graphic novels is as vast as the Sahara. ALPHA follows an African refugee on a tortuous journey across that very desert. The story is by Bessora, a French author of African and European ancestry. French illustrator Barroux’s  lush ink wash drawings bring an immediacy to the journey. Alpha, a carpenter, is compelled toContinue reading “ALPHA: Abidjan to Paris, -a graphic novel”

Running with Type like Frank Viva

I showed my Digital Illustration class Frank Viva‘s illustrated book, Sea Change.  The typography is wonderful. The Globe and Mail put it nicely, “With Sea Change, a graphic novel in the truest sense, author and designer Frank Viva blurs the lines between written word and illustration.” Sea Change is published by Toon Books as part of theirContinue reading “Running with Type like Frank Viva”

$15,000 Advance for a Kid’s Comic by New Artist. Hey, you!

Graphix, the young adult and children’s comics imprint of Scholastic announced a contest at Comic-con. Some contests are scams; they charge high entry fees, or insist you give up rights to your characters at time of entry. This one looks wonderful. It is only for unpublished creators. The prize is publication and a $15,000 advance.Continue reading “$15,000 Advance for a Kid’s Comic by New Artist. Hey, you!”

Viva Frank Viva!

  I love Frank Viva’s “Trip to the Bottom of the World with Little Mouse.”  It is drawn digitally in Adobe Illustrator, yet it has a retro feel. I got to meet the Canadian author/illustrator at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Boston. He flew down from Toronto where he heads an award-winning graphic design agency, VivaContinue reading “Viva Frank Viva!”

PYONGYANG on my mind.

I’ve been to Seoul and Pusan in South Korea, but everything I know about Pyongyang I learned from a comic book. Guy Delisle drew a marvelous book, Pyongyang, a graphic memoir of working there in 2001. Few Americans ever visit Pyongyang. Delisle is Canadian from Quebec, He was hired by a French studio to directContinue reading “PYONGYANG on my mind.”

Hansel and Gretel and Lorenzo and Neil

Once upon a time, in 2007, The Metropolitan Opera staged Humperdink’s Hansel and Gretel.  Françoise Mouly, art editor for The New Yorker, helped organize an exhibition at the opera house based on the fairy tale. Contributors included stellar New Yorker cover artists including Roz Chast, Jules Feiffer,  Anita Kunz, Christoph Niemann, Gahan Wilson, and LorenzoContinue reading “Hansel and Gretel and Lorenzo and Neil”

Tom Hart & Leela Corman on Grief & Cartooning

I went to NYC for the 92nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium. I’ve missed 90 meetings, but they are a welcoming bunch. The Symposium pops up someplace different each meeting, so you need to find it. The Symposium is free, info here.  This is not Comi-Con. The emphasis is on D.I.Y., independent and innovativeContinue reading “Tom Hart & Leela Corman on Grief & Cartooning”

Get Down: BOX BROWN is on a roll

COME SEE BOX BROWN! “How to Make Comics Every Day and Still Be Alive” -Box Brown, Sept 17th Sharadin Arts Bldg. Kutztown U, Rm 120, 7pm. Free! This is the same talk he is giving at the Library of Congress earlier in the week. I met cartoonist Box Brown at MOCCA. He is the creatorContinue reading “Get Down: BOX BROWN is on a roll”

Andre the Giant is BIG!

  I was reading multiple great books: a novel set in Mexico; a literary biography; a history of the U.S invasion of Iraq. Then I opened a padded envelope to find a review copy of Box Brown’s Andre the Giant: Life and Legend. Those other books got thrown out of the ring. Looking at theContinue reading “Andre the Giant is BIG!”